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« Angels in America | Main | "Master and Commander" »

December 05, 2003

Nicolas Gomez-Davila

Dear Friedrich --

Nikos Salingaros has made a remarkable discovery -- the work of a Colombian philosopher named Nicolas Gomez-Davila, who shaped his thoughts into aphorisms. Never heard of him myself. Neither have you, and neither has anyone else visiting this blog, because Gomez-Davila's work has never appeared in English. Till now: Salingaros has translated a sampling of Gomez-Davila's aphorisms, and has provided a fascinating introduction here. Two of my faves:

In philosophy, a single naive question oftentimes suffices for the whole system to collapse.

For the progressive modernist, nostalgia is the supreme heresy.

Jim Kalb takes enthusiastic note here.

Best,

Michael

posted by Michael at December 5, 2003




Comments

Reminds me a bit of the great Polish satirist Stanislaw Jerzy Lec.

Literature is often blamed it makes escaping reality too easy for its prisoners.

But was Lec ever translated?

Posted by: ijsbrand on December 5, 2003 5:05 PM



At least one book by Lec was, it seems.

"Not every salvo announces the revolution."

"Truth will always be naked, even when turned out in the latest fashion."

"All is in the hands of man. Therefore wash them often."

More here:
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Forum/5344/lit/lecengl.html

But consume them in small doses.

Posted by: ijsbrand on December 5, 2003 5:18 PM



No house is ever cat proof.

Posted by: Alan Kellogg on December 5, 2003 10:07 PM



Individualism is the cradle of vulgarity.

I gather he wasn't an admirer of Ayn Rand, then.

Posted by: James Russell on December 6, 2003 3:50 AM



Salingaros prefaces his translations with: "I need to warn the reader that Nicolas Gomez-Davila was unashamedly conservative"

I wonder why he felt the warning was necessary? Are those people sympathetic to Christopher Alexander's ideas, who I assume are Salingaros' primary visitors, -- are they generally leftists? Or was the warning for Math profs?

It seems to me that if one accepts Alexander's "nature of order", it's hard not to accept a Hayekian view of the economy, and the politics that follow.

Posted by: Paul Mansour on December 6, 2003 3:14 PM



Please stop the spam

Posted by: FREE PORN on May 29, 2004 7:07 PM






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